Lockheed Martin completes second live tracking exercise for ballistic missile defense

Lockheed Martin has announced that on August 15 it successfully identified and tracked four live targets during a test of its Multi-Mission Signal Processor (MMSP) being fielded as part of the Aegis next-generation Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) capability.

1st Sep 2010


Lockheed Martin has announced that on August 15 it successfully identified and tracked four live targets during a test of its Multi-Mission Signal Processor (MMSP) being fielded as part of the Aegis next-generation Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) capability.

The MMSP is part of the Navy’s Advanced Capability Build 12 system, intended to help combine next-generation Aegis BMD and anti-air warfare (AAW) capabilities in an open combat system architecture.

“This is our second demonstration of the MMSP capability, and both have successfully shown its abilities to detect, track and engage targets,” said Allan Croly, director, Naval Radar Programs, for Lockheed Martin’s Mission Systems and Sensors business unit. “MMSP allows our customers to track threats that would have gone undetected with lesser capabilities.”

 

The first demonstration conducted earlier this year showcased the radar’s AAW capability while this test focused on the radar’s BMD capability. Both were conducted using an augmented Aegis system at the Navy’s land-based test facility, the Vice Admiral James H. Doyle Combat Systems Engineering Development Site in New Jersey. Additional testing will occur through 2011.

 

As part of the Aegis Modernization Program, MMSP is scheduled for installation on guided missile destroyers currently equipped with the Aegis Weapon System, starting in 2012.


Lockheed Martin say the Aegis BMD element of the US ballistic missile defense system provides the capability to use hit-to-kill technology to intercept and destroy short- and medium-range ballistic missiles. Additionally, Aegis BMD-equipped ships provide surveillance and tracking of intercontinental ballistic missiles and work with other elements of the nation’s missile-defense systems to provide advance warning for the defense of the nation, deployed U.S. forces, and allies.
 

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